Nutritional approach to mental issues like Bipolar Disorder
(manic-depressive illness), Schizophrenia, Attention-Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) & Obsessive Compulsive Behaviour
In recent years I have been convinced that all of these mental health issues have their root
cause in Ortho-Molecular Medicine & Science.   I have witnessed too many people improve
mentally with high dose supplementation and read too many studies, that I believe this
approach should at least be experimented with by anyone who cares enough not to want
just a drug approach.  The drug approach often is helpful, but they can come with many side
effects that can be worse than the illness itself.  Often, improvements don't even outweigh
the negative side effects, so a natural approach would perhaps have a better treatment result,
overall, if your looking for a more holistic outcome.   Unfortunately, since these compounds I
will discuss are natural and cannot be patented as drugs for a huge profit, I doubt seriously
whether anyone will ever do a big enough study to convince the global scientific community
at large, but perhaps it may convince
you.
First, lets look at some recent studies and then I will make some conclusions and comments
at the end. Remember to always run this information by your Doctor and see if he will work
with you on any implementation or find one that will, or understand that you are taking your
health in your own hands, which is your constitutional right, but I will not accept any liability.  
It has to be your decision and I believe you should take charge of your own health, when ever
you are not satisfied with the results you getting with conventional medicine.  

Fish oils and manic-depressive illness
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Manic-depressive illness (bipolar disorder) is a common, severe mental illness involving
repeated episodes of depression, mania (rapid mood changes, hyperactivity, and excessive cheerfulness) or both. It is
usually treated with drugs such as lithium carbonate or valproate. Unfortunately, these drugs are not very effective and
recurrence rates are high. It is generally believed that bipolar disorder involves an overactivity in the neuronal signal
pathways. Omega-3 fatty acids are known to dampen this overactivity and the hypothesis has been advanced that they may
be useful in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Medical scientists have now confirmed this in a landmark study just completed
at the Harvard Medical School. The double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 30 patients (men and women 18 to 65
years of age) who had all been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Half the patients were given seven fish oil capsules twice
a day while the placebo group were given seven olive oil capsules twice a day. Each fish oil capsule contained 440 mg of
eicosapentaenoic acid and 240 mg of docosahexaenoic acid. All of the participants except four in the fish oil group and four
in the placebo group also continued to receive a standard mood-stabilizing drug prescribed previously.
The mental state of the participants was measured using four scales (Clinical Global Impression Scale, Global Assessment
Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) at the start of the study and after two, four,
six, eight, twelve and sixteen weeks.
Twelve of the 14 participants in the fish oil group completed the four-month study without major episodes of mania or
depression as compared to only six out of 16 participants in the placebo group. Also, while nine of the placebo group
members experienced worsening depression none of the fish oil group members did. The four patients in the fish oil group
who had not been prescribed mood-stabilizing drugs all completed the study without major episodes, but only one member
in the placebo group not on mood-stabilizing drugs did. The average decline in depression rating on the Hamilton Scale was
almost 50 per cent in the fish oil group as compared to an increase of 25 per cent in the control group. The Harvard
researchers urge further trials of fish oils in the treatment of depression and manic-depressive illness.
Stoll, Andrew L., et al. Omega 3 fatty acids in bipolar disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 56, May 1999, pp. 407-12 and pp. 415-16
(commentary)
Calabrese, Joseph R., et al. Fish oils and bipolar disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 56, May 1999, pp. 413-14 (commentary)


Depression and amalgam fillings
FORT COLLINS, COLORADO. There is some evidence that people with dental amalgam fillings are more likely to suffer from
depression than are people without such fillings. Now researchers at the Rocky Mountain Research Institute report that
removal of amalgam fillings can markedly improve the symptoms of manic- depressive illness (bipolar disorder). Their study
involved 20 patients who had been diagnosed with manic-depressive illness. All the patients had amalgam fillings (an average
of 10 fillings each). The concentration of mercury in the mouth was measured at the start of the study and was found to
increase almost 300 per cent after chewing gum for 10 minutes. Other research has shown that 75 per cent or more of the
mercury vapor released by chewing is inhaled into the lungs where it enters the blood stream and subsequently passes into
the brain. Eleven of the patients were assigned to have all their mercury fillings removed and were also given multi-vitamins
and antioxidants to help chelate and remove the mercury released during the dental work. The remaining nine patients had a
sealant placed over their fillings and were told that this sealant would prevent mercury from being released from their fillings.
In actual fact there was no evidence that it would do so. The control group patients were given a supplemental vitamin and
mineral tablet. The patients all completed various questionnaires designed to evaluate their mental health before and six to
eight months after treatment. It was very clear that the patients who had had their amalgam fillings removed had improved
very significantly in such important parameters as anxiety, depression, paranoia, hostility, and obsessive compulsive
behaviour. Some of the patients were able to discontinue their lithium medication after amalgam removal. The researchers
caution that their study was relatively small and urge large scale clinical trials to validate their findings
.
Siblerud, Robert L., et al. Psychometric evidence that dental amalgam mercury may be an etiological factor in manic depression. Journal of
Orthomolecular Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 1, First Quarter 1998, pp. 31-40

NEWSBRIEF - Ritalin conference produces no consensus. A panel of experts met recently in Washington, DC to discuss
the massive surge in the use of Ritalin to treat children diagnosed with attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit
hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is estimated that four million children in the United States are now taking Ritalin; in Britain
the number of Ritalin prescriptions is doubling every year. Proponents of the drug say it helps calm unruly children and
allows them to learn better; however, a recent study found that Ritalin-users show almost no improvement in academic
achievement and skills. Critics say that Ritalin simply makes children more docile while creating the danger of long term
damage to brain chemistry.
New Scientist, November 28, 1998, p. 3 & 24


Fish oils: A cure for depression?
WASHINGTON, DC. On a worldwide basis more working days are lost to depression than to any other illness. The incidence of
depression is growing with people born within the last 50 years being twice as likely to suffer from it than were their parents.
Dr. Joseph Hibbeln of the National Institutes of Health believes that the reason for the increase in depression can be directly
attributed to a major shift in dietary patterns, specifically fat intake. He points out that the vast increase in the use of soy,
corn, palm and cottonseed oils in the last 100 years has totally changed the traditional ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty
acids in the diet. Soy oil consumption in the US, for example, has increased thousand-fold in the last 100 years helping to
skew the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio from about 1:1 to today's 16:1. This, Dr. Hibbeln believes, spells trouble. The brain
consists pretty well entirely of fat so clearly one's fat intake could affect one's brain composition, particularly the ion
channels which channel signals in and out of the brain. There is also evidence that low levels of omega-3 fatty acids are
associated with low levels of the mood hormone serotonin. Dr. Hibbeln's hypothesis is supported by the fact that the
incidence of depression is considerably lower in countries with a high fish consumption.
Fish, particularly fatty ocean fish, is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and its frequent consumption would help to
nudge the ratio back towards the optimum 1:1. At least three clinical trials have observed a marked improvement in
depressed patients given relatively high doses of fish oils. This has spurred other scientists to look closer at the potential
benefits of fish oil supplementation. At the moment there are at least 10 clinical trials underway evaluating fish oils in the
treatment of depression, attention deficit disorder, and schizophrenia.
Small, Meredith F. The happy fat. New Scientist, August 24, 2002, pp. 34-37


Fish oils and manic-depressive illness
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Manic-depressive illness (bipolar disorder) is a common, severe mental illness involving
repeated episodes of depression, mania (rapid mood changes, hyperactivity, and excessive cheerfulness) or both. It is
usually treated with drugs such as lithium carbonate or valproate. Unfortunately, these drugs are not very effective and
recurrence rates are high. It is generally believed that bipolar disorder involves an overactivity in the neuronal signal
pathways. Omega-3 fatty acids are known to dampen this overactivity and the hypothesis has been advanced that they may
be useful in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Medical scientists have now confirmed this in a landmark study just completed
at the Harvard Medical School. The double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 30 patients (men and women 18 to 65
years of age) who had all been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Half the patients were given seven fish oil capsules twice
a day while the placebo group were given seven olive oil capsules twice a day. Each fish oil capsule contained 440 mg of
eicosapentaenoic acid and 240 mg of docosahexaenoic acid. All of the participants except four in the fish oil group and four
in the placebo group also continued to receive a standard mood-stabilizing drug prescribed previously. The mental state of
the participants was measured using four scales (Clinical Global Impression Scale, Global Assessment Scale, Young Mania
Rating Scale, and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) at the start of the study and after two, four, six, eight, twelve and
sixteen weeks. Twelve of the 14 participants in the fish oil group completed the four-month study without major episodes of
mania or depression as compared to only six out of 16 participants in the placebo group. Also, while nine of the placebo
group members experienced worsening depression none of the fish oil group members did. The four patients in the fish oil
group who had not been prescribed mood-stabilizing drugs all completed the study without major episodes, but only one
member in the placebo group not on mood-stabilizing drugs did. The average decline in depression rating on the Hamilton
Scale was almost 50 per cent in the fish oil group as compared to an increase of 25 per cent in the control group.
The Harvard researchers urge further trials of fish oils in the treatment of depression and manic-depressive illness.
Stoll, Andrew L., et al. Omega 3 fatty acids in bipolar disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 56, May 1999, pp. 407-12 and pp. 415-16
(commentary)
Calabrese, Joseph R., et al. Fish oils and bipolar disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 56, May 1999, pp. 413-14 (commentary)


Your brain needs DHA
NEW YORK, NY. Dr. Barbara Levine, Professor of Nutrition in Medicine at Cornell University, sounds the alarm concerning a
totally inadequate intake of DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) by most Americans. DHA is the building block of human brain tissue
and is particularly abundant in the grey matter of the brain and the retina. Low levels of DHA have recently been associated
with depression, memory loss, dementia, and visual problems. DHA is particularly important for fetuses and infants; the DHA
content of the infant's brain triples during the first three months of life. Optimal levels of DHA are therefore crucial for
pregnant and lactating mothers. Unfortunately, the average DHA content of breast milk in the United States is the lowest in
the world, most likely because Americans eat comparatively little fish. Making matters worse is the fact that the United States
is the only country in the world where infant formulas are not fortified with DHA. This despite a 1995 recommendation by the
World Health Organization that all baby formulas should provide 40 mg of DHA per kilogram of infant body weight. Dr. Levine
believes that postpartum depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and low IQs are all linked to the dismally
low DHA intake common in the United States. Dr. Levine also points out that low DHA levels have been linked to low brain
serotonin levels which again are connected to an increased tendency to depression, suicide, and violence. DHA is abundant
in marine phytoplankton and cold-water fish and nutritionists now recommend that people consume two to three servings
of fish every week to maintain DHA levels. If this is not possible, Dr. Levine suggests supplementing with 100 mg/day of DHA.
Levine, Barbara S. Most frequently asked questions about DHA. Nutrition Today, Vol. 32, November/December 1997, pp. 248-49




Comments:   I believe EPA / DHA derived from fish oils are one of the biggest issues here.  
Particularly the DHA portion of the
Omega 3's.   I also know that zinc plays a critical role in
mental health as does B-Complex, especially Niacin (B-3) which when low enough in street
alcoholics, causes them to talk to and see people or things that don't exist and to have
episodes of depression, violence, anger, paranoia etc.
DMAE is also very good for ADHD.

Watch...
Natural Cure for Schizophrenia...

Here would be a sample program that might be considered.

Mega EFA -   EPA/DHA Concentrate - 2 with breakfast and 2 with dinner.

DHA Concentrated Omega 3 - Specific for ADHD - Follow label

DMAE Drops - Specific for ADD & ADHD - Follow Label

EDTA    -   Detoxification of heavy metal accumulation in the body -  1 capsule with breakfast
and 1 with dinner.

Opti Zinc - 1 with breakfast and dinner

Mitochodrial Energy Booster - Try 2  to 4 caps with Breakfast

NSI Vitamin B3 (Niacin) -  500 mg  - Should be added for Schizophrenia - 1 with breakfast
and 1 with dinner.   It will cause a flush, which is uncomfortable but will taper with time.  
It is not dangerous, but has had great results.

Change the diet by removing all wheat and sugar, adopt
The Ideal Diet and look into the
possibility of removing amalgam fillings with a holistic dentist.